to top 10 table

Best Crosscountry Skis

last updated Feb 27, 2019

When you hit the slopes and get to whip down a mountain quickly, feeling all the freedom cross-country skiing can provide, you’ll know immediately if you have the best cross-country skis for your adventures. While the sport of skiing hasn’t changed much over the years, the equipment has, and modern cross-country skis have a lot to offer nowadays. To save you some time researching the best cross-country skis, we’ve provided a list for you here of some of the best skis you can possibly choose, and we’ll also give you a few pointers about how to make your selection.

This is the best product on our list that is currently in stock:

icon
Fischer S-Bound 98
94.3/100 our score
Materials
95
Features
94
Ride
94
Fischer S-Bound 98
Why is it better?

Large metal edges

Great climbing

Good speed

Affordable

In a Hurry? Editors choice:
Fischer S-Bound 98
Test Winner: Fischer S-Bound 98
Researched Sources
13
Researched Sources
Reviews Considered
1,232
Reviews Considered
Hours Researching
8
Hours Researching
Products Evaluated
8
Products Evaluated
Last Updated:
By Sami Kritz:

It's time to start gearing up for the slopes again. Our updated list of Cross-Country Skis now features more details for each product and more buying options. The Salomon Snowscape is in the #1 spot and is a great pair for beginners. To see how we chose each product, take a look at the criteria section and don't forget to vote on which criterion is most important to you!

Sorting Options
Materials Features Ride By Default
Rank
PictureProduct
Name
Rating
Shops
#1
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
98
Materials
99%
Features
97%
Ride
98%
Price Comparison Last Updated (20.05.19)
$198.00
#2
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
97
Materials
97%
Features
98%
Ride
96%
Price Comparison Last Updated (20.05.19)
$161.95
#3
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
94.3
Materials
95%
Features
94%
Ride
94%
Price Comparison Last Updated (20.05.19)
$359.85
#4
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
92.7
Materials
94%
Features
92%
Ride
92%
Price Comparison Last Updated (20.05.19)
$170.95
#5
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
90.3
Materials
91%
Features
93%
Ride
87%
Price Comparison Last Updated (20.05.19)
$584.95
#6
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
89.7
Materials
89%
Features
93%
Ride
87%
Price Comparison Last Updated (20.05.19)
$249.99
#7
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
89
Materials
87%
Features
92%
Ride
88%
Price Comparison Last Updated (20.05.19)
$129.97
$139.97
See Deal
#8
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
87
Materials
88%
Features
84%
Ride
89%
Price Comparison Last Updated (20.05.19)
In Depth Review Top 10
  • Salomon Snowscape 7
  • Rossignol Delta
  • Fischer S-Bound 98
  • Madshus Redline Carbon Skate
  • G3 Zenoxide Carbon 105
  • Rossignol Evo OT 65
  • Atomic Motion Skintec
  • Fischer Ultralite Crown EF Ski
Table of contents
  • Criteria Used for Evaluation
  • Other Factors to Consider
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Sources

Top 10 Picks

1. Salomon Snowscape 7

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
98
Salomon Snowscape 7
Materials
99
Features
97
Ride
98
best offer for today
more shops
$198.00
Pros:

Wide body

Great for beginners

Cons:

Won’t work well for more experienced skiers

Don’t come with bindings

If you’re not an experienced skier, and are either a beginner or somewhere at the starter level, then you’ll want a good pair of skis made for this. Salomon Snowscape 7’s Cross-Country Skis offer an excellent product that could fit your needs. Salomon Snowscapes are designed with a wide body, which will help your stability and keep you upright so you don’t have to worry about sinking down into the snow when you’re learning how to ski cross-country.

Read more

Materials
Salomon’s Snowscape 7 comes not only with a wide body to help stabilize newbies, but also has an easy heel-toe camber to help you climb so you don’t overly stress your legs. Also, the waxless bottom and partial metal edge designed into these skis assist with turns, making the process of learning the slopes a bit simpler.

Features
Salomon’s Snowscape 7 skis are also made to be lightweight so that you can move in them easily and not worry about hurting your hips when you move. Designed into the skis is a strong Densolite material, which helps with durability.

Ride
These skis are made to help newer ski lovers learn how to perfect their skills, and help build up confidence on the slope while you’re learning. With the stability and support needed for those at the beginner level, you’ll be able to learn what you need to learn easily so you can enjoy your sport more often.

2. Rossignol Delta

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
97
Rossignol Delta
Materials
97
Features
98
Ride
96
best offer for today
more shops
$161.95
Pros:

Flexible skis

Increase velocity

Soft Core

Cons:

Wider body not great for more experienced skiers

Wider body can also limit your speed

For those skiers that want skis designed to help them move faster, the Rossignol Delta Cross-Country Skis offer you a racing edge without hurting your pocketbook drastically. While racing skis can be very expensive, these skis offer a fast edge while still providing extra learning benefits to help boost your skills.

Read more

Materials
These feature an Activ’Cap construction and a honeycomb core. The honeycombed core of these skis has a design that’s focused on speed. It is important to keep in mind the center area of these skis won’t be as stiff as your typical skate ski, which is usually the type of ski used for beginners. You’ll also need to push a bit harder with the ski to increase your acceleration, but you will get a boost in speed with these skis.

Features
Rossignol’s Delta Cross-Country Skis allow you to enhance your racing edge while improving your skills. They are designed to increase your pace and help you move. The core of these skis is honeycombed, which helps make these skis lightweight and boosts their speed.

Ride
Rossignol’s Delta Cross-Country Skis are made with a wider platform to help those learning how to ski still achieve what they need to improve. Plus, the design, with the focus on speed, will help you increase your velocity easily.

3. Fischer S-Bound 98

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
94.3
Fischer S-Bound 98
Materials
95
Features
94
Ride
94
best offer for today
more shops
$359.85
Pros:

Large metal edges

Great climbing

Good speed

Affordable

Cons:

Have a bit of a learning curve

Need to take time to master these skis

Fischer’s S-Bound 98 Cross-Country Skis are great for those at the intermediate to beginner levels who are looking for a decent pair of affordable mid-range skis. Designed with a waxless body for better speed, these skis can boost up your velocity as you move through the wilderness.

Read more

Materials
The fiberglass channel inside the skis makes this a very durable pair of skis. The full edges on the Fischer S-Bound Easy Skin lets you climb up hills easily also help you turn better when you hit the slopes, increasing your potential. If you’ve already developed some basic skills, these skis can help you increase your ski potential and learn more.

Features
The design of Fisher’s S-Bound skis do resemble the design of their Orbiter skis, but with the S-Bound you get a wider body to help you handle powdery snow better, and also to increase your balance overall. Plus, these skis have an added benefit—they work very similarly to snowshoes when you climb, which is a nice feature to have when you have to walk uphill.

Ride
Fischer’s S-Bound 98 skis are made to handle difficult terrain and have a fully loaded Backcountry technology system to help boost your control. Their Nordic Rocker Camber, made with open ski tips, will boost your ability to glide and climb.

4. Madshus Redline Carbon Skate

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
92.7
Madshus Redline Carbon Skate
Materials
94
Features
92
Ride
92
best offer for today
$170.95
Pros:

Lightweight

Responsive

Very fast

Cons:

Can feel very stiff

Hard for beginners to control

If you’re interested in doing some serious racing, then the Madshus Redline Carbon Skate Cross-Country Ski, made by Norwegian ski manufacturer Madshus, is one of the best racing skis on the market today. Madhsus’s Redline Carbon Skate Cross-Country Skis are made with a high-performance Rohacell PR100X foam acrylic core, which makes these skis very lightweight, easy-to-carry, and great at packing down snow.

Read more

Materials
The core on the Madshus Redline Carbon Skate Cross-Country Skis are made with carbon around the core area, allowing for a stiff body and less flex, but increased motion while you are on-the-go. Plus, these skis are made to be very responsive to what you need to do as you move but are really made for skiers who are at the expert level.

Features
Made for maximum power transfer without forcing you to waste your energy or motivation, you’ll be able to ski well on these even when the weather is very cold. For the more advanced skier looking for a velocity boost, these skis just might be what you need.

Ride
The rides you’ll get on the Madshus Redline Carbon Skate Cross-Country Skis are frictionless and smooth, and overall quite impressive. The new P200 Naon Black NM (Nove Mesto) base on these skis makes them glide incredibly well, and you’ll get a lively feeling from these skis each time you use them.

5. G3 Zenoxide Carbon 105

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
90.3
G3 Zenoxide Carbon 105
Materials
91
Features
93
Ride
87
best offer for today
$584.95
Pros:

High float

Lightweight

Great movement

Cons:

Could turn tighter

Body could be longer

Wide turning radius

Expensive

While the G3 Zenoxide Carbon 105 Cross-Country Skis are on the more expensive side, they’re made for the serious skier and are worth their weight in gold. G3’s Zenoxide Carbon 105 skis are made with a poplar core, so you get a very lightweight, easy-to-move ski whose design has a lot of quality features and benefits.
These skis are selling fast, snatch a pair while you still can!

Read more

Materials
The G3 Zenoxide Carbon 105 Cross-Country Skis are designed with excellent float capability, so they are very easy-to-use on hard-core climbing adventures, bringing you a lot of power and speed once you hit the slopes. Plus, they provide smooth flexibility through the carbon body of the ski design, which helps boost your ability to move and glide efficiently.

Features
G3 designed these skis so that they are versatile and can handle just about any terrain you’ll encounter, and they’re excellent for people that like a challenge. These skis can take you through a multi-day mountain adventure and still give you everything you need to boost your speed.

Ride
Plus, you’ll get a lot of stability from the design of these skis, which are made to help balance out and control the other lightweight features. These skis have large steel edges to help you bite down on very harsh terrain, a feature many hard-core skiers enjoy about these skis.

6. Rossignol Evo OT 65

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
89.7
Rossignol Evo OT 65
Materials
89
Features
93
Ride
87
best offer for today
more shops
$249.99
Pros:

Unisex

Lightweight

Mid Length

Cons:

Only compatible with NNN boots

This striking pair of skis are just as versatile on the slopes as they are in your home. Our favorite set of unisex skis are lightweight, predictable, and can handle terrain up to black diamond level.

Read more

Materials
The Rossignol Evo 65 features a wooden core with an air channel, helping to achieve a trifecta of balance, strength, and flexibility. The waxless Positrak base provides a strong grip with the feeling of dragging. Our favorite feature is the partially metal edges, providing more turning power.

Features
The low weight of 5.84 pounds makes these skis very portable and ideal for both men and women. These skis are available in four different sizes and feature a classic binding flex.

Ride
The versatility of these skis is what makes them stand out. These skis are mid-length and make sharp turns a breeze. The Rossignol Evos are perfect for singletrack groomed or ungroomed trails. Explore the backcountry with confidence.

7. Atomic Motion Skintec

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
89
Atomic Motion Skintec
Materials
87
Features
92
Ride
88
best offer for today
more shops
$129.97
$139.97
See Deal
Pros:

Affordable

Good responsiveness

Easy climbing

Cons:

Could be more durable

Not much of a velocity boost

If you want some high-quality, affordable skis that will help you climb and also don’t require a lot of up-keep, you might be interested in the Atomic Motion Skintec Cross-Country Skis. The technology built into these skis includes a design that holds underfoot to work like an extra climbing grip, and these skis are made for those who like to just grab their gear and go.

Read more

Materials
Atomic designed their Motion Skintec Cross-Country Skis includes mohair construction to help increase climbing capabilities, while at the same time, needed less maintenance than many other skis. So, if you’re a skier that gets tired of constant ski maintenance, you’ll have an easy time keeping up with these low-maintenance skis. Designed with a straight, skinny shape, these skis can slice through just about any type of snow easily. Plus, these skis include a High Densolite core, which will help you boost your energy and responsiveness as you’re moving.

Features
Atomic’s skis can be used in a variety of different snow conditions and terrains, and are made to be versatile no matter where you find yourself outdoor. With a nice design and several low-maintenance benefits, these are a good pair of skis to have with you on your next adventure.

Ride
Atomic’s Motion Skintec Cross-Country Skis are made to be used on days where there’s a fresh blanket of powdery snow, and you’re in the mood to hit the thick pine groves and powdery snow off-trail. The modules manufactured into the underfoot area of these skis help you climb and kick better, making it easy for you to get where you want to go.

8. Fischer Ultralite Crown EF Ski

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
87
Materials
88
Features
84
Ride
89
best offer for today
more shops
Pros:

Unisex

Lightweight

Powerful

Cons:

No metal edges

Unreliable weight/length chart

This set of lightweight skis are ideal for cross country while providing enough of a glide for a racing ski. They are unisex and excellent for beginner to advanced skiers. Fischer offers these skis in six different lengths, ranging from 179cm to 204cm.

Read more

Materials
Featuring an Air Tech Basalite core with a power layer, these skis are shockingly powerful while remaining lightweight and springy. The stone ground finish on the base ensures a smooth run.

Features
These are availavle in two different sizes, which each offer a different experience. These unisex skis only weigh two pounds and can be used by any level of skier. We don't imagine that you will have any issues with these skis, but Fischer offers a four-year warranty.

Ride
As far as size goes, 179cm will give you more control and 204cm will give you more speed. Reviewers claim that the kick pattern provides an excellent grip and a smooth ride.

Criteria Used for Evaluation

Materials

When trying to determine what type of cross-country ski you’ll need, you need to first consider where you’ll be skiing, and what the conditions will be like. Depending on this, the material of the ski is important. Maybe you prefer a stone ground finish or wooden air chambers?
If you prefer more on-track ski, and like using trails, then you can opt for touring skis or race and performance classic skis. If you’re a beginner hitting the ski tracks, you’re probably better off with touring skis, since race and performance classic skis require more advanced skills and better techniques than touring skis.
Of course, if you’re planning on going out off-track and hitting hard terrain, then you’ll need some metal-edge touring skis. Really, the type of ski you purchase will be up to you, but you’ll want to match where you’ll be skiing and what your level of ski experience is up to the skis you decide to purchase since you’ll get optimal performance that way.

Features

Cross-Country Ski Length
To determine what type of ski length you’ll need to get out of your cross-country skis, you’re going to have to factor in your body weight. Body weight is the major item to look at when you’re trying to figure out what type of length you need. However, where you’ll be skiing and how you’ll be skiing are also factors to consider when figuring out the ski length you’ll need.
So, do you need shorter or longer skis? If you’re a recreational skier or like rugged terrain types, shorter skis are usually slower on the trails, but a lot easier to use if you’re new to the game or hitting harsh areas. Also, if you find that you’re between sizes when you’re measuring your body weight for your ski size, it’s almost always better to go with the shorter length if you are still new to the game of skiing. However, if you’re athletic or already at the expert level when you ski, then you can opt for the longer range.
Ski width is usually a three-location measurement with most cross-country ski manufacturers. First, skis are measured at their tip or the widest point at the front part of the ski, then the waist, which is the narrowest part in the ski’s center, and lasts the tail found at the back of the ski. The hourglass shape made by most ski designs is known as the sidecut, and the three-point measurement of skis helps determine how this sidecut will appear.
The middle, narrow point of the ski, or the waist, sometimes has two parts dedicated to it on the ski and features a broad center. Skis made like this are designed to support boots well and also are made to keep them from grabbing onto the snow when you’re trying to make a turn.
If you’re going to be hitting groomed tracks and trails when you ski, then you’ll want the tip of your ski to be no wider than 70mm, which is the maximum width of ski tracks. Also, you’ll want a small sidecut so that your skis can move along on a straight path more easily. If you are considering race and performance skis, remember that they’ll be narrower than touring skis naturally, since they’re made to be lightweight and boost your velocity. Metal-edge touring skis should have a good width and an average sidecut so that you can glide well and turn easily.
If you’re a skier that likes a lot of variety and wants a versatile ski that can cover everything, in-and-out-of-track skiing, then get a touring ski that’s 65 to 70 mm and doesn’t have metal edges. Or, you can get a narrow metal-edge touring ski. Either one of these ski types has a lot of versatility in the design.
Depending on what your body weight and ski levels are, you’ll need to factor both those concepts in when figuring out the length of ski you want. Beginner skiers should go for shorter skis, but intermediate to advanced skiers have some room to move in this category.

Cross-Country Ski Camber
Next, you’ll want to look at the camber, or the bow of the ski, on your cross-country skis. Typically, cross-country skis are manufactured with a Nordic, or double camber that features two different parts.
The first part of the camber helps you when you have equal weight on both skis, like when gliding down a hill. When you do this, the ski’s “grip zone,” or waist area, stays arched upwards off the snow so that you can travel downwards more quickly.
The second part of the camber helps you when you put all of your weight onto one ski, and you flatten your ski against the snow for extra grip and traction before your kick forward. At this point, the ski is focused more on the grip than balance or movement.
Most cross-country ski manufacturers design skis with both types of camber features in them, but some metal-edge touring skis do come with a single camber, making the arch more gradual at the center of the ski. Skis that have a single camber typically help equalize weight better over the whole ski base, making it easier to turn well.
When you’re looking at the camber features on your cross-country skis, you’re likely to find that most cross-country skis feature double cambers, and this usually works just fine for what most skiers want to do. If you do plan on purchasing metal-edge touring skis and want to do more hardcore off-trail skiing, then you might want to consider that single camber. Otherwise, you’re probably fine with a double camber design.

Cross-Country Ski Flex
Other criteria point you’ll want to consider when evaluating your skis is their flex, which dictates how well your skis will turn and how fast they’ll move. Soft-flexing cross-country skis help you grip for better turning capability on softer snow and if you ski at slower speeds. On the other hand, a stiff flex works well when snow is firm and you’re moving at high speeds.
If you know where you’ll be skiing, how quickly, and what the snow will be like, then that can help you determine what type of flex you want in your cross-country skis. However, this isn’t a feature you should primarily base your judgment of your skis on since you don’t need to worry too much about ski flex unless you want to race or move at high speeds. Otherwise, it can help you make your choice in ski, but won’t nece3ssarily make or break your performance outdoors.

Ride

All components come together to create a smooth ride. The shape, length, and materials. One thing that stands out on a smooth ride is the wax of the skis.

Waxable vs. Waxless Cross-Country Ski Bases
When you’re out skiing and you need to climb or walk on flat ground, skis need to be able to grip the snow well (some manufacturers refer to this as their “kick and glide.”) Most cross-country skis are manufactured to grip using one of two strategies; the first way is by using wax, and the second way is by using a texture pattern to help with grip.
So, the thing you’ll have to consider is whether or not you want waxable skis or waxless skis. Let’s break down the features of both.

Waxless skis
These skis are very popular on the market since they give you grip conveniently and can handle a wide variety of different snow issues. Waxless skis don’t use kick wax to help you with your grip, but instead have a textured pattern in the middle are of the ski that helps you grip into the snow. Even though waxless skis typically state you don’t need to apply glide wax to them, they still perform better on hard terrain when you do.

Waxable skis
You’ll need to be willing to maintain these skis a bit more, but they can do better than waxless skis as long as you match the kick wax well with the snow you’re dealing with. Waxable skis get grip from using rub-on kick wax that’s placed on the middle area of the ski. You’ll get great glide out of these skis, and excellent grip. However, if you know you’ll be out in cold or crazy temperatures that are around freezing, waxing will be a problem and you’ll want waxless skis at this point.

Depending on the conditions you’ll be doing your skiing in, and how close to freezing the weather is, you’ll be able to determine if waxless or waxable skis will be better for you. A lot of this is a matter of personal preference and depends on the type of cross-country skiing you plan to be doing.

Expert Interviews & Opinions

Most Important Criteria (According to our experts opinion)
Sort criterias acording to:
Experts Opinion Editors Opinion Users Opinion By Default
Click on a to rate the most important criteria:
#1
Materials
Rate This Criteria as Most Important
#2
Features
Rate This Criteria as Most Important
#3
Ride
Rate This Criteria as Most Important
Pre-Slope Work Out

Skiing is an intense sport and provides a great cardiovascular workout. You wouldn't expect to run in a 5k without any training, right? It's the same on the slopes. It is important to prepare your body and strengthen your muscles before hitting the Black Diamond.

Clothing

Clothing can be just as important as skis, poles, or wax. You will want to avoid cotton, becuase it can easily soak up water and takes a while to try. Breathable materials and fleece are best for this sport.

Other Factors to Consider

Terrain

Most cross-country ski types fit one of three designs: touring skis, race and performance classic skis, or metal-edge touring skis. We’ve covered each in a bit more detail below.

Touring skis
These types of skis are made for groomed trails and tracks. The design features of most touring skis focus on them being narrow, longer, and lighter in weight. Typically, the combination of this design focus makes touring skis very quick and efficient to use.

Race and performance classic skis
Like touring skis, race and performance classic skis are usually designed to be used on groomed tracks. Unlike touring skis, these types of skis are made for faster, aggressive types of skiing. With race and performance skis, you usually find that they are designed with a stiffer flex than most touring skis. That means they won’t be easy for beginners to use, and you’ll need to have your technique down if you opt for skis like this.

Metal-edge touring skis
If you plan on doing off-track skiing or like hitting steeper terrain, then you’ll want to opt for skis like this. Metal-edge touring skis are usually designed to be shorter than touring skis, making them easier to maneuver. Plus, metal-edge touring skis are also usually wider to give you more stability and flotation when you’re hitting difficult snow. Plus, they also have tough metal edges so you get the grip you need when you hit the ice. Metal-edge touring skies also are made with a greater sidecut so that you can turn better on harder terrain. Because metal-edge touring skis have so many features, they are heavier than most touring skis but made to handle terrain that’s off-the-track better than other ski designs.

When trying to determine what type of cross-country ski you’ll need, you need to first consider where you’ll be skiing, and what the conditions will be like. If you prefer more on-track ski, and like using trails, then you can opt for touring skis or race and performance classic skis. If you’re a beginner hitting the ski tracks, you’re probably better off with touring skis, since race and performance classic skis require more advanced skills and better techniques than touring skis.

Of course, if you’re planning on going out off-track and hitting hard terrain, then you’ll need some metal-edge touring skis. Really, the type of ski you purchase will be up to you, but you’ll want to match where you’ll be skiing and what your level of ski experience is up to the skis you decide to purchase since you’ll get optimal performance that way.

Frequently Asked Questions

q: What are some different characteristics in skis that can affect their performance?
a:

A few characteristics of skis will affect their performance, and also can help you determine what types of skis you’ll really need for the cross-country skiing style that fits your approach. First, the width and weight of your skis will matter if you care about your ski velocity range. The base material’s quality on the ski can also affect your speed. However, you’ll also want to consider the camber, or flex of your ski when figuring out how you’ll be skiing, and whether you want a single or double camber.

Probably the most important thing you’ll want to look at is your skill level when you’re looking at characteristics that can affect how your cross-country skis perform. Beginner skiers usually ski with his or her weight in the back while learning the sport, while an expert ski with his or her weight forward.

With that in mind, a beginner skier is going to “kicks” a ski differently than an expert will since an expert will get a lot more kick power with less effort. (Remember that “kick” means pushing against the snow and compressing the camber to spring the ski back into its shape so you can glide more quickly).

Now, recreational skis are typically easier to kick and control, and can work well for beginners, but also limit how and where you’ll be skiing. Also, if you know you’ll be skiing a lot and are likely to improve quickly, you might want something else besides a recreational ski so you don’t have to spend money on yet another pair of skis.

So, you need to consider what level of skier you’re planning to become, how long and how often you’ll be skiing during the winter, and the types of skiing you eventually plan to do. With that in mind, you can determine if you want to purchase a pair of skis just to get started, or something that might be harder to use at first, but can adapt to you as you get better at your sport.

q: Should I buy skis for my current or goal skill level?
a:

It’s always a good idea to buy your skis at the level you want to achieve—as long as you’re going to be reasonable about that level. You don’t want to buy expert skis when you’ve never skied before and have quite a bit of learning to do. But, you do need some room for growth, and as long as you are realistic about that growth, you should consider purchasing a pair of skis that will help you learn, but also can help you through the intermediate level of growth as well if you are, for instance, just starting out.

If you’re up to the point where you’ve got some skill and can handle yourself well enough to get around, and are somewhere at the intermediate level, you might want to consider racing skis. Racing skis are not that hard to use, and you can put wax on them if you have issues with grip. Plus, they’re the types of skis that will grow with you.

So, buy your skis so that they can grow with you, and help you become better—but again, be realistic about that assessment and approach so you don’t wind up with a pair of skis that’s far too difficult for you to use. Keep your confidence up, and keep growing.

q: Can I wax my skis at home?
a:

Yes, you can wax your skis at home. Without wax, your skis will not glide easily. The proccess can be quite tedious, but it is possible.
To make a long explanation short, you will first need to prep your skis. You can use a small amount of citrus degreaser to clean off all of the dust and dirt from the skis. Be careful not to use too much or you may dry out your skis.
Next, you must choose your wax. There are many different waxes available. A hot wax is always preferable but is more difficult to use. You can use an all-weather wax if you don't have the patience to find a specific wax for your terrain or temperature.
While irons designed for skis are always preferable, you can also use the iron you have at home. Use the iron on a low setting to heat up the skis, then use the iron to melt the wax onto the skis. After you have dripped the wax over the skis, you put the iron on the skis and glide it over to evenly distribute the wax. Be careful not to let the iron sit in one spot for too long.
Once the wax has dried, it is time to scrape the skis. This will remove any excess wax. Once you have scraped the bases of the skis, you shouldn't be able to see the wax anymore. It is a good idea to pay attention to the sides of the skis as well, to avoid problems when turning.
Lastly, you need to brush the skis. This will, again, remove excess wax and provide a smoother ride.

There are multiple different methods to home-waxing your skis, this is just one example.